Analysis

How Iran Might Respond to an Attack from Israel or the US
Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad visits the Natanz uranium enrichment facility in 2008 where Iran is enriching uranium in defiance of UN and IAEA resolutions. Natanz would be a primary target for a US or Israeli airstrike. (Photo by the Office of the Presidency of the Islamic Republic of Iran via Getty Images)
November 8, 2011
| Security
| Middle East and North Africa
Summary
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Experts interviewed by LIGNET believe Iran would most likely respond to a US or Israeli airstrike on its nuclear sites by encouraging its terrorist proxies to commit terrorist acts and fire missiles against Israel. The experts generally agreed that other more aggressive steps are possible but unlikely and probably would prove effective if taken.Over the last week there has been growing speculation in the Israeli media that Israel is close to launching an airstrike on Iranian nuclear facilities. News of a possible attack was apparently leaked by former senior Israeli intelligence officials who oppose such an attack. Israeli officials did not deny the reports and instead ordered an investigation into the leaks.  Click HERE to read LIGNET's analysis of reports of Israeli planning for an attack on Iran.

 

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