Analysis

Are Lone Wolves Now the Biggest Threat to the U.S.?
New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, right, speaks at a news conference about alleged 'lone wolf' terrorist Jose Pimentelon on November 20, 2011 as Mayor Michael Bloomberg looks on. Police say Pimentelon planned to detonate pipe bombs at post offices and police stations, as well as against U.S. troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)
April 20, 2012
| Security
| Asia and the Pacific, Middle East and North Africa
Summary
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Tom Sanderson of the Center for Strategic and International Studies told LIGNET this week that he considers “lone wolves” — individuals working alone to commit acts of terror — a very serious threat to the West, and one that’s not easily addressed.
“They have very small signatures. They’re not easy to spot like you can with a satellite training group in Yemen, or in northern Mali,” he told LIGNET. “They’re individuals whose safe haven could simply be their bedroom at their home in Connecticut.”

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